18
May
2020
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11:23 AM
America/Chicago

Higher Education Headlines: May 18

By Sheryl E. Taylor

Get your daily dose of higher ed headlines. Just a click away.

Class of 2020 Graduates Face Worst Job Market Since Great Depression
Houston Chronicle
Job offers revoked. Internships canceled. The next chapter of life on hold.
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Opinion: We Need Tuition Free College. For Adults.— The New York Times
Much as the G.I. Bill served to power the postwar American economy, a federal guarantee of education for workers could accelerate an economic recovery now.
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Colleges Worry They’ll Be Sued If They Reopen Campuses—Inside Higher Ed
College presidents tell Vice President Pence that being shielded from lawsuits if students get sick would make them likelier to physically reopen their campuses.
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State Cuts Grow Deep—Inside Higher Ed
Experts had predicted states would have to cut higher education funding. The scope is becoming clearer every day. [Free Subscription Required]

Tito’s Vodka Gives Baylor College of Medicine $1 million for COVID-19 Vaccine Research—Houston Business Journal
The grant from the brand’s philanthropic arm — Love, Tito’s — will help accelerate research on a vaccine for the virus. [Subscription Required]

Loss of Sports Spells Trouble Far Beyond Athletics Departments—The Chronicle of Higher Education
As college leaders make plans for the fall semester, one part of campus life that hangs in the balance — and holds outsize importance for some students and alumni — is the slate of fall sports. [Free Subscription Required]

Campus Life In The fall? A Test With No Clear Answer—The New York Times
The nation’s largest public university system will stay online, but other colleges are determined to bring back students. The patchwork could look much like the rest of the country.
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Graduate Degrees Boost Job Prospects During Pandemic More Than Others
Inside Higher Ed

Researchers expected any kind of higher education to boost job prospects for Americans recently out of work. But they found those with graduate degrees are doing better than other degree holders. [Free Subscription Required]

Students’ Internships Are Disappearing. Can Virtual Models Replace Them?—The Chronicle of Higher Education
Employers themselves and new facilitators are stepping up to create alternative virtual internships, in some cases working closely with colleges to ensure academic credit.
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Opinion: Corornavirus Could Force Colleges to Trim Some Fat—The Wall Street Journal
Students offer a few ways universities can make ends meet during the pandemic.

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Graduation Goes Virtual and Robotic During Pandemic—The Wall Street Journal
The pandemic is forcing schools around the world to postpone or rethink graduation ceremonies. A university in Tokyo is using robots as stand-ins for graduates, while a number of students are creating a virtual world to commemorate one of the most important day of their lives.
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Coronavirus in Texas: St. Edward’s University Lays Off Employees—Texas Tribune
The university has been “profoundly and negatively impacted by COVID-19 pandemic in virtually every aspect of operations, from classroom instruction to athletics programs to facility management,” university President George E. Martin said in a letter to the community.
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About the University of Houston-Downtown

The University of Houston-Downtown (UHD)—the second largest university in Houston—has served the educational needs of the nation’s fourth-largest city since 1974.

As one of four distinct public universities in the University of Houston System, UHD is a comprehensive four-year university led by Dr. Juan Sánchez Muñoz. Annually, UHD educates more than 14,000 students; boasts more than 51,000 alumni and offers 44 bachelor’s and eight master’s degree programs within five colleges (Marilyn Davies College of Business; Humanities & Social Sciences; Public Service, Sciences & Technology; and University College).

UHD has the most affordable tuition among four-year universities in Houston and one of the lowest in Texas. The University is noted nationally as a Hispanic-Serving Institution, Minority-Serving Institution and Military Friendly School. For more on the University of Houston-Downtown, visit www.uhd.edu.